Affirmations and Mantras for healing

Self-talk is known to be one of the most important parts of mental strength. Athletes consistently use it (often together with visualisation) to help with performance under pressure. My suggestion is that it is just as important when you are injured and facing the challenges of recovery and rehabilitation.

Are you wondering what is self-talk? I define it as the voice in your head that chatters constantly, about all kinds of things and at times can escalate to a full-on internal debate. But there is good evidence that the mind takes these messages and images very seriously, driving changes in the hormonal system and the nervous system which in turn have very significant physical impacts (as well as changing your thought patterns going forward).

Affirmations or mantras are usually short, pithy phrases to insert positive messages into the mind. I would also be remiss not to mention that in the Hindu faith and yoga mantras are chanted, with specific mantras to generate powerful sound waves that promote healing, and the relaxation from the ancient practice of gong therapy or ‘sound bathing’.

This is something that many people write about. I especially enjoyed Carole’s blog from 2014 where she talked about Dr Coue’s mantra (or autosuggestion as he called it) where in conjunction with their medical treatment, they would say over and over to themselves 20 times in the morning and 20 times in the evening ‘Every day, in every way, I am getting better and better’. Read more on this inspiring story from over 100 years ago, plus some great tips and book recommendations in Carole’s blog:

What kind of mantras help?

When I was running ultramarathons and doing Ironman triathlons, I used mantras a lot and found:

  • It needs to be positive. I had a spin teacher who used ‘mine is the power and the glory’ as a mantra, and I know that many people find these universally positive exhortations very useful– hence the Ironman slogan of ‘Impossible is Nothing’.
  • It needs to be realistic at that moment! For instance, telling myself ‘I love to run’ is true, but in the final stages of ultra-marathons or long-distance triathlons the voice on my shoulder would scream back ‘I don’t right now – I want to stop!’ so I would use simple exhortations like ‘run for home’ or ‘nice and steady’.
  • It is better when it is process-based.  There are times in a long race where the final finish line seems too far away to engage with, and so process-based mantras worked better for me. This seems a strong parallel with the uncertainty on outcomes in recovery and rehabilitation. So just as I would focus on technique points in races like ‘keep my rhythm’, ‘nice and light’, which brings the benefits to keeping good technique at a time when tiredness can reduce form. In the same way in the tough part of recovery focus on the exercises, release work, nutrition, hydration and sleep patterns can reinforce the positive habits that will make a difference.
  • It is not helpful to set specific goals that you then miss. Whilst I have spent many races setting myself a challenge for the next split time, or the person that I would overtake, these are only useful when you hit the goal and then set the next goal. Missing them really can really drag you down, as it allows the internal critic to keep saying that today is not your day and you may as well just give up.

How do I apply that to my recovery?

It is really useful to reaffirm your strengths and the resilience that you bring to this situation: from the factual such as ‘we have a good plan and next steps with the medical team’ or ‘we are focused & determined and will get to the bottom of this’, ‘I have what I need to get through this’, ‘all of this strength and conditioning will make me a better athlete’ to the more aspirational ‘we will beat this’, ‘I’ll be back’, ‘my body is amazing’ and ‘I’ve come through tough times before and I will again’.

Also to recognise all of the people on your side and rooting for you: ‘I am in great hands’, ‘I am surrounded by love and support’, ‘I stand shoulder-to-shoulder with my team’, ‘I am enveloping my body in love and kindness’.

Reaffirming the sense of progress – even when it is too small to see: ‘every day of careful nutrition and good sleep helps my body to rebuild’, ‘little by little my body is healing itself’ and ‘every step towards recovery helps me’, ‘cell by cell my body is rebuilding itself’.

Some people find perspective very useful – for example: ‘whilst this is tough, people are facing much worse than this and getting through it’.

Some inspiring quotes

This link includes some inspiring quotes for injured athletes that could be used as mantras:

https://www.theodysseyonline.com/25-quotes-inspire-injured-athletes

So why not try it?

How about choosing a favourite mantra and use it every day for a week – repeat it under your breath over and over at key points in the day, write it on a post-it and put it on the bathroom mirror or under your pillow, close your eyes and smile gently as you visualise it… the mind is a powerful thing.

Your body and mind are amazing – ‘Every day, in every way, you are getting better and better’

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