Another self-help technique for back pain – the McKenzie method

I had lots of people getting in contact after my blog earlier this week on back pain, so wanted to quickly share this additional technique that has brought relief and recovery to many. I hope that some of you find that it helps.

For a lot of people (especially runners and cyclists it seems) back pain comes and goes episodically. For most the issue is a disc bulge (most people over 25 or 30 years-old seem to have them to some level), and the disc bulge moves slightly, compressing one of the 4 key nerves at that lumbar vertebrae level and sends white-hot pain, pins & needles and/or numbness down the leg, sometimes with symptoms in the bum cheek or hip as well.

Each nerve has a role for areas of the body and internal organs. If you are interested in understanding the link between the level of the spine (which vertebra) and the body, have a look at the spinal nerve chart: https://millerchiropracticclinic.com/spinal-nerve-chart/

A lot of people have found great relief through the McKenzie method

First of all, take this simple self assessment – answering yes or no to each of the questions:

  1. Are there periods in the day when you have no pain? Even 10 minutes?
  2. Is the pain confined to areas above the knee or above your elbow?
  3. Have you had more than one episode of low back pain or neck pain over the past few months or years?
  4. Do you feel worse during or immediately after prolonged bending or stooping; as in making beds, vacuuming, gardening, concreting, etc?
  5. Do you feel worse when sitting for prolonged periods or on rising from the sitting position, ie after watching TV or working on the computer?
  6. Do you associate your pain with any one particular activity but are generally pain-free when not engaged in this activity?
  7. Do you feel worse when inactive and better when on the move?
  8. Does your low back feel better when lying face down? (You may feel worse for a minute before the pain subsides, in that case, the answer to this question is yes).
  9. Does your low back pain feel better when you are walking?

The McKenzie Institute claims that if you have answered yes to more than 4 questions, your chances of gaining benefit from the McKenzie method is very good.

They say that if you answered yes to 3 or fewer, then you may require specialised assessment and treatment.

The McKenzie method is built on gentle spinal extension exercises

The theory behind the method is that most discs bulge out backwards, and therefore gentle extension exercises encourage the disc to change shape with more of the disc-matter at the front and take the pressure off the nerve that it is compressing.

Robin McKenzie’s book ‘Treat your own back’ is inexpensive and practical – giving a do-it-yourself plan for relief of lower back pain through postural changes, ergonomics, and simple exercises. It also provides a clear understanding of the causes and treatments of persistent back pain.

One last key tip

I think that anyone who goes to a physiotherapist with back issues is given spinal extension exercises. But I am not sure that everyone talks about technique, and it is really important. If you simply move into the spinal extension, then all of the muscles in the lower back shorten as you peel up. But if you engage your abdominals (especially the deep Transversus Abdominus) and then do the back extension, then the same muscles go into extension due to the reciprocal inhibition of the muscle pairing with the abdominals. This is what you want.

2 Replies to “Another self-help technique for back pain – the McKenzie method”

  1. Never heard of this method. We use a chiropractor that uses the Mctimony method. Very gentle but it works for us.

    1. Thank you for commenting. It is great to hear what is working for different people. I understand that chiropractors who use the McTimoney method do not have the audible cracking during the realignment that puts many people off.

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