Love your feet!

I guess that I should have known how important feet are, but I will admit that I took mine for granted. And so when I lost all feeling in my right foot after my accident, I was still way too nonchalant. After all, the Paralympians run like the wind with blades – I was sure that I would learn.

The foot is so complex

Each foot has 26 bones, 33 joints (20 of which are actively articulated) and more than a hundred muscles, tendons and ligaments. Wow! And feet can move in so many directions and with amazing levels of control. And these link all the way up the leg into the lower back.

This is all so important to us, as tiny differences in the pressure and our movement at the foot level are all multiplied up through the body as the distance from the feet increases – with compensating and balancing to ensure that we stay upright and are able to do what we want to do. Think of how crucial footwork is in any fast-moving sport like tennis, squash, football, rugby, hockey etc.

So what should we be doing?

Given the importance of our feet, we really need to invest the same level of body care as we would in the other major muscle and movement centres. I went to a seminar with a physiotherapist who was proposing that runners should really do a 15 minute footcare workout every day in order to protect themselves from injury!

The toes are very important – especially the big toes

I remember a friend having an accident when we were in our 20’s and after it being crushed on a building site, he had to have the first section of his big toe amputated. This meant that balance and running were always really difficult for him, and he almost always wore walking boots with ankle support to stabilise his foot.

But it does not need to be as severe as that for us to lose mobility – in our feet and all of the way up through our body. Here’s a quick test – can you do the ‘vulcan salute’ from Star Trek (splitting your fingers between the 2nd and 3rd fingers) with each hand? Can you similarly control each of your toes?

Toes are very trainable – you only need to type ‘painting with feet’ into YouTube to be inspired at dexterity that people can develop in their toes.

A couple of foot work exercises for the toes

When sat down, can you use your toes to pull a towel along the ground? (without lifting the sole off the ground).

When you are lying in bed – when your feet are pointing upwards can you move your big toe up and down without the rest of the toes moving? And then the other toes, without the big toe moving? And now when you move your foot to point your toes, can you do the same toe flex and curl?

Difficult? You can help your toe mobility by continuously challenging your toes. Do also massage under the foot – through the arch just below the pads in the forefoot, feeling each of the bone/muscle and ligament complexes that control each toe (go gently, as it is always tender in there!).  Then extend the massaging and movement to each of the toes – pushing against your hand in different directions and with your foot in different positions.

Also, do roll the arch on a tennis ball. Be amazed by the simple test of touching your toes and remembering how far your hands reach. After 30 secs of rolling the arch on a tennis ball, focusing on those gritty, grainy parts with smaller circles. Then touch your toes again and check your reach. Amazing! (Some people sneakily have a tennis ball under their desk to do this arch-rolling in the office during the day!)

The amazing ankle

For all that the ankle is a hinge joint, you can do so much more than just the dorsiflexion/ plantarflexion movement of pointing the toes. You can actually roll the ankle from side to side in the inversion/eversion movement where from the feet being parallel, you can then bring the soles of your feet together and then roll the soles outwards.

This movement is incredibly important and useful for stabilising in walking and all sports.

So exercising it is good. Sit on a chair and with our hands on our knees to stop them moving, roll the ankle from side to side, so that the weight is over the big toe and then over the small toe. This may seem difficult to at the start, but is very trainable.

The feet are controlled from the lower leg

A lot of what happens in the feet is influenced by the leg (and indeed all of the way up the body).

Releasing the muscles in the lower leg associated with the foot movement is also very useful. It needs a lacrosse ball and careful placement and flexing, but this is worth doing daily if possible.

More inspiration

If you are battling with this, I have found the following website and podcast interesting and useful. Best of luck with getting your feet supporting your movement in the best possible way – reducing pain and increasing performance. Best of luck!

https://corewalking.com/

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