My experience with hydrotherapy

I have not blogged for a while whilst I have been trying new things, doing lots of research and trying to make progress on reducing my pain and increasing my ability to cope with day-to-day tasks and activities. It has been an interesting voyage where I have become clearer that there are many paths to recovery – and no-one has the universal answer, so you have to try lots of things! With this in mind, I thought that I would share in a few blogs over the coming weeks some of my recent experiences.

Hydrotherapy was one of the things that was suggested after each of my surgeries. It is 45 mins drive to the nearest hydrotherapy pools and there are none in my local authority area. Plus you have to have a medical referral form and go through some extra checks to get access, so it all took a bit of organising. But I think that is was well worth it, as I think that it reduced pain in the short-term and had an incremental improvement in the Range of Movement (RoM) in the scar tissue and the affected muscles.

What is hydrotherapy?

The hydrotherapy pool is kept at 37 degrees Celsius, which consistently feels very pleasant and after 30 mins of doing structured exercises feels positively hot!

It is about shoulder depth and about 10m across, so it is easy to get the benefit of the water resistance as well as the immersion.  There is also easy access, including a hoist so that you can get in and out even when your body is not working well. Given that there is only space for a small number of people, it is key to reserve the slot and be there changed and ready in time.

You can work with a physio in the session, but once you have a routine it is relatively easy to work through the exercises on your own. There are ‘weights’ made from floats to create additional resistance by pushing them down in the water and inflatable ‘noodles’ for support.

How is it better than a normal pool or hot tub?

I had tried both the normal pool and hot-tub, and would say that the hydrotherapy pool is much better.

Doing my exercises in the pool was hard work (remember that 1 litre of water is 1kg – so there is lots of weight in the water resistance), and the cooler water temperature that makes it suitable for swimming means that there is not the therapeutic benefit of the muscle release that helps with RoM and probably with the pain reduction too.

I had also used the pool to try a little aqua-jogging with the float-belt (as shown in the photo). This is used a lot by elite athletes when they have injuries and it is claimed that you can keep 80% of your running fitness if you put the same hours in at the pool. This should work really well for lower limb injuries where you need to keep the muscle memory, but avoid the impact (especially in stress fractures and some soft-tissue overuse injuries). But given that for me the inflammation affects the movement pattern, I found that it was too tough at this stage.  

The aquajogging float belt clips around you to keep you upright without your feet touching the bottom of the pool (you need a pool deep enough for this!) and you can add difficulty by holding a waterbottle in each hand and changing the amount of liquid in it for more difficulty.

The hot tub is useful for me for the muscle release and for managing some of the pain. But it is not deep enough or large enough to do all of the exercises, so it is not as good as the hydrotherapy pool. I think also that the 30 mins slot, where everyone else is also working on their exercises, brings a level of focus that really helps.

Did it make any difference?

My own experience was that it was a very supportive environment – everyone there is working on getting better and is very willing to share what they have had success with.

In terms of the physical impact, the warmth definitely had a positive impact in terms of reducing pain for a few hours (just like hot water bottles etc when at home). My understanding is that this is not universal – some people find that the pain is reduced with cold, others with warmth.

Plus, I found that 30 mins of hydrotherapy definitely improved RoM for a period of 24-48 hours and if I did it 3 times per week, I saw real progress on my land-based exercises. That said, it was positively hard work – after 30 mins the combination of the temperature and the hard work was very tiring and I was keen to get out and have a nice drink of water! And the travel on top made it quite a bit harder. So, I would say that if you have a hydrotherapy pool nearby, do make use of it in your recovery and rehabilitation.

One Reply to “My experience with hydrotherapy”

  1. Hi Jenny,

    I think it is worth trying different therapies to see what works for you. I personally have never tried hydrotherapy. What I do feel works for me though is a sports massage and even a type of relaxing massage. It’s unfortunate that massage has a poor reputation due to links to the world’s oldest profession because I find it very therapeutic.

    Regards
    Oggie

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