My Saturday night at a ‘Psoas Release Party’

There have been many firsts since I got injured, but spending over 4 hours on a late Saturday afternoon and early evening at a ‘Psoas Release Party’ is one that I thought you would all like to hear about!

The workshop was led by Jonathan FitzGordon, who started out as a yoga teacher in the USA but now works on rehabbing people in terrible pain. He freely admits that most people come across him at 3 in the morning, when they are at the end of their rope and don’t know what to do to get out of pain. This is exactly how I came across him.

What is the psoas?

Jonathan’s theory is that the illiopsoas is the most important muscle in the body. The ‘psoas is a really interesting compound muscle, as it is very difficult to reach and touch, as it starts deep in the back (up near the ribs) and loops around the inside of the hip before attaching at the front top of each of the legs in the groin area. For all its inaccessibility, it is a large muscle and is one of only 3 linking the front and back of the body, and attaches in 6 places – so pretty complex. It is often simply called a hip flexor, but it has a role in much more than this. Jonathan attributes the majority of long-term pain in the hips and back, plus the knees and feet, and even the shoulders to how the psoas is behaving.

I read Jonathan’s book ‘The Psoas Release Party’ and was struck with some of the concepts and case studies. I tried some of his stretches and releases and felt that I had started the journey. Then I saw that he was coming to the UK and was doing a workshop…

The description of the workshop said: “The psoas is the most important muscle in the body acting as the main hip flexor and the engine of walking. A free and happy psoas allows the body to move with peak efficiency and little strain. Issues with the psoas can lead to any number of problems throughout your body—both physical and emotional. Lower back pain and other joint discomfort as well as disturbances to the nervous system can be linked to the psoas. This is not a yoga class. You will spend the afternoon awakening, learning about and releasing the Iliopsoas muscle group and understanding its core function within the body.”

So that is how I ended up being one of 16 people crammed into quite a small yoga studio just near to Wimbledon studio on a late Saturday afternoon. It was mainly women, with a few men and the ages spread from early 40’s into 70’s – and every single person in the room was in pain, and wanted to do something about it.

How did the party get going?

Jonathan did an amazing job of making the anatomy really interesting and memorable, and before long we were all evaluating our dominant muscle patterns when standing still. He looked especially carefully at the balance between the front and back muscles, and the angles down the body: from head to shoulders, from shoulders to the lower thoracic spine at the bottom of the ribcage, from this point to the hips and from the hips to the ankle and into the foot.

He had a wonderful manner of wandering around and gently pointing out individual muscle patterns–for instance, the level that each of the hips were in the sockets, the level of internal/external hip rotation playing into the weight distribution in the feet, overall muscle imbalances and the level of tension in the glutes (butt) and rib-cage.

And what was interesting, was how we all had to be coached for the tell-tale cues and signs – even though almost everyone in the room (other than me) had a yoga or dance training, making them very body aware and elegant in their movement (but still in pain!)

What were the tell-tale cues?

Overall, the biggest message that I took from the workshop was that we all hold too much tension in the wrong places. Given that as soon as one muscle is tight, the opposite (antagonist) muscle simply cannot do anything until the first muscle releases. And this is important because some of these muscles (like the psoas) are large and connect with key processes like breathing, staying continent(!) and movements like sitting, walking and standing.

So stay loose and relaxed!

To do a body check yourself and see whether there are any ah-ha moments across the day:

  • Think about your butt when you are standing and walking – are the muscles tight? (if so, the psoas cannot do anything). A friend of mine tried this for a week and was stunned at how often across the day she found that all of the muscles in her butt were tensed up!
  • Think about your rib cage – if you sigh out a deep breath does the tension change? (if so your latissimus dorsi may be overworking)
  • Are your hips forward and your thighs extended when you stand? (if so, your hamstrings are constantly short and may get persistently tight)

Was there anything practical?

It was pretty much all practical! The four hours simply flew by – we did not stop for any breaks, and yet there was not a moment where I was not learning, making notes, trying different movements and learning more about the cues and signs of my muscle patterns.

The last 90 minutes was spent on 8 gentle stretching movements – most of which were held for a very long time (we did some for 15 mins, and Jonathan can recommend an hour or more at times!) in order to allow the psoas to truly let go. Whilst I had tried almost every single one of these from the book, the specific tuition on the important points of form was incredibly useful and I understood why I may have been missing out the benefits through simply trying it on my own without perfect technique. And the good news is that they are very easy to do at home (indeed one we even talked could be done in a break at the office, if you have a role that requires sitting at a desk all day – which of course is very bad for the psoas due to spending so much time in hip flexion).

Overall verdict – worth the money!

I have to admit that I thought about whether to attend for weeks before I committed – the hassle of a 45-minute drive to get there, no parking at the location and the £65 workshop fee. But my husband was kind enough to drive me and drop me off at the door, and benchmarked against other treatments that I have had, it was worth the money.

And like all of the best parties, with the late finish we were locked in!

I would strongly recommend Jonathan’s book – but the workshop took it to another level for me in terms of the personal insights and advice, plus the detailed coaching on the correct technique for the exercises. If you are not able to get to a workshop, Jonathan does do Skype consultations and I cannot over-emphasise the level of knowledge that he brings to your personal situation and his commitment to getting you out of pain. I am not at all surprised that he has helped and supported so many people to incredible recovery and rehabilitation.

And there is even a summer retreat in Italy…

Fascinating reading, with useful explanation and practical exercises

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