Round and round in circles

My experience of rehab is lots of circles!

Whilst finally being able to move a little can feel like a release from incarceration and make you want to re-explore the world that you once knew, the reality is that it probably needs to be much closer to home!

You need to be ready to stop and rest, or stop and return home at any stage – as pushing through pain can lead to a major set-back. So, I have built loops with benches, coffee stops and quick routes back to the car (in order to return home).

I think that I now know the distance to all of the benches within a half-mile radius of home! And even bought one of those walking sticks with a pop-up seat. It was surprisingly inexpensive, and actually comfortable enough for a little rest and recovery – although you would not want to sit on it for a long period!

Having a goal, but being flexible on the way of achieving it

Initially, I struggled because the goals seemed ridiculous – for instance 4 laps of 200m in a day and then a rest day seems petty when you have run marathons and ultra-marathons.

And then I struggled even more because I could not complete them without being doubled-over with the strobing pain – the other part of the goal was without any increase in pain level.

The goals are really important – as they help you to make and monitor progress over time, without over-extending yourself. And I learned to stop deriding how petty they were and to start to think of little rewards if I managed them, like a square of dark chocolate or a cup of coffee.

I also learned how to regress it when I could not achieve it – either by reducing the distance, or by increasing the rest interval. So I would walk to the bench with my book and if my body was not ready to walk back, I would either sit for a while or read for a while and then head back. And then do the same later in the day.

The psychological benefit of a change of scenery

I would also drive to wooded areas so that even very short loops looked and felt different as I walked them. And the opportunity for a nice cup of coffee as a reward sitting at a different café and taking in a different view!

Rule number 1 – leave the watch at home!

I have to admit that the only time I would do laps was as a part of training – whether a track, road or off-road loop – the goal would always be to look at the splits of each lap! This mentality of constantly pushing yourself is not at all the mode of gently listening to your body for the early cues of progress or issues – so it is important to leave the watch at home, and avoid cheeky glances at the lap times!

The hardest parts & my coping mechanisms

The parts that I struggled with were:

  • Stopping in time – since often the worst pain would be later in the day, I struggled to find the cues of when to stop if the session needed to be curtailed. The two insights that helped a little were: (i) spotting the very early signs of fatigue and stopping whilst there was at least one more lap in me and (ii) leaving enough time for my body to settle in between each one – so I would plan to sit for at least 10 minutes and at times 30-40 mins and even an hour to let the body settle and see how it felt.
  • Keeping the discipline and only doing the plan, even on days when I felt I could do more – because I couldn’t wait to be better and make faster progress, it was hard not to over-extend by adding an extra little walk to see something when I was feeling great. Especially when I was with friends, for whom so little activity was quite boring and their natural temptation was to tacitly or explicitly encourage you to go faster or do more. My two coping mechanisms were (i) for all that it was lovely to see people, doing these was better done alone and meeting them for a coffee later (ii) keeping a log of all of the exercises and what level and type of pain I had was a useful tracker for the programme and to talk with the medical experts.
  • Sometimes these leave me very inflamed and I then struggle to sleep – so I always do the sessions in the earlier part of the day in order to give the body more time to recover.

In summary – celebrating the circles!

As you probably gather, I found the process of going round and round in small circles rather hard to get my head around. So planning for it and finding ways to celebrate is key – every single one marks progress and is an opportunity for some fresh air and seeing different things. So well worth celebrating!

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