What I learned from going to see a nutritional therapist

I had to go back into hospital for some manipulation under anaesthetic due to the limitations on my movement from the scar tissue after my hip surgery. I had been dutifully massaging the scar tissue on the outside but came to realise just how much scar tissue there was on the inside that was reducing my range of movement and potentially one of the causes of pain. This led me into a journey to look at what I could do with nutrition to try to help my recovery.

So, for the first time ever, I went to see someone for dietary advice – with the specific question of whether I should be taking supplements to help my healing, and if so, which ones.

Layering the different aspects

I had previously thought that nutrition was mostly common sense, but I learned a lot from the way that Saffron (the nutritional therapist) layered what I needed:

  • Starting from a well balanced diet – with 7-a-day vegetables and fruit, plus a good split at each meal of complete proteins, good fats, and wholemeal carbohydrates as well as maintaining good hydration. She also specifically asked about how often we eat fish, and especially oily fish – as apparently the British are standardly very short of the long-chain omega 3 fatty acids. The ideal is apparently at least two portions of fish per week, with at least one oily fish.
  • Then looking at my age and lifestyle to get a sense of the hormonal pressures and tensions, as well as the aging factors on all of my tissues.
  • Whether I have had any blood tests to give information on nutrient shortages. These are very useful for things like anaemia (shortage of iron) and vitamin D shortages (common in Northern Europe, especially in winter or for people who stay inside a lot).
  • Checking for any food allergies or intolerances, or specific dietary requirements. I am very lucky with the robustness of my digestive system, so it means that I can draw on most foodstuffs – I just need to be organised enough to plan the right meals, shopping, and preparation! (I am sorry – I realise that some of this advice is not going to be so helpful for vegetarians, but a nutritional therapist will work with everyone’s dietary requirements).
  • Building from there to the current medications that I am taking – and talking me through the receptors that these medications block and hence what dietary changes and vitamin supplements may be needed to reflect this. For instance, the need for extra fibre for the constipation from painkillers, sulphur if taking ibuprofen, and extra B-vitamins (B6 and B12) when taking muscle-relaxants and antidepressants.
  • Then looking at the injury and the surgeries to understand what tissues are trying to heal – in my case covering bone, joints, cartilage, muscles, ligaments, and fascia, as well as scar tissue.  She talked about the importance of protein and zinc to help the muscles and ligaments repair. So a quality protein with each meal, and a wide range of pulses, grains, seeds, and nuts for the zinc. Getting nutrients to the bone and joint is more challenging – so I will come back to this theme below.
  • From the symptoms that I am still experiencing what extra may be needed. For instance, Magnesium is the mineral involved in relaxing muscles (whilst Calcium is involved in muscle contractions), so extra Magnesium can help with the muscle spasms and cramps. Magnesium-rich foods include spinach, avocado, seeds, nuts, yoghurt, banana and best of all: dark chocolate!
  • Then we talked about inflammatory foods, vs anti-inflammatory foods. Whilst inflammation is an important process in the initial weeks after the injury and surgeries, now months down the line there is a chance that swelling and inflammation is getting in the way of healing. Hence foods can help as one of the factors that can reduce inflammation. Overall, processed foods with high fat and processed sugars are inflammatory, plus fizzy drinks and nitrates, and nitrites in processed meats like smoked bacon and ham (you can buy nitrite-free versions), and of course, mild toxins like caffeine-based drinks and alcohol. The anti-inflammatory foods include tomatoes, leafy greens, olive oil, nuts, fruits, and oily fish.

Reducing scar tissue

As I said, reducing the scar tissue internally is a big goal for me, as I think that it will improve my mobility and potentially reduce the pain.  Saffron recommended proteolytic enzymes which are supposed to help minimise and reduce scar tissue after the surgeries.  These need to be taken away from food for best impact (either 30 mins before a meal, or an hour after a meal). Natural enzymatic foods include pineapple and papaya (yum!)

Rebuilding the bone

Of all of the injury and surgical aspects, we spent a lot of time talking about how to get blood flow and nutrients to all of the damaged tissues. Obviously, the bones are one of the most difficult to reach and the only access in the joint is via the synovial fluid. This points to the importance of movement in healing, as this only happens with movement that increases both blood flow to carry the nutrients around the body, and synovial fluid movement and regeneration.

The nutritional advice is to bring bone broths into my diet – using them instead of stock.  She counselled that it might seem weird to begin with but that you can get bones from butchers – they just give them away (I think that they normally assume they’re for a dog…) https://wholefully.com/bone-broth/

Normally your body will synthesise the necessary building blocks itself for bone synthesis and (to a certain extent) repair but it does get more difficult as we get older and we have less of the ‘whole’ ingredients in our diet such as animal skin (like on chicken etc), marrow, offal etc.  So this is where a supplement may be easier. 

Dealing with continued inflammation

Turmeric has become one of the anti-inflammatory supplements of choice for athletes. There is a lot of discussion about the format, and whether it is needed to be activated with black pepper or not. There is not a clear answer. The focus is probably best on getting one with sufficient amounts of the curcuminoids that create the reduction in inflammation. It needs to be taken with omega-3s for impact, which given the frequency really means using a good quality supplement.

More that we could have talked about

I have to admit that there was so much more that we could have talked about – and maybe I should go back in a few weeks once I see the impact of a few changes.

For instance, many people say that having had 7 general anaesthetics, rebuilding the gut fauna with a good probiotic is a priority to ensure good absorption of nutrients.

In summary

I came away with a much clearer view of what I should be doing in my base diet and the things that I should be eating more of and the things to avoid. I also finally answered the debate that I had been having with myself about supplements – and decided that the extra demands of this recovery phase meant that a few specific supplements would really help me.

But more than this, it was a real wake-up on the complexity of nutrition and how everything works together. It has been a great insight at this stage of injury, medication etc. But when life changes again, I think that there is a real value from getting expert insight on the body’s nutritional needs and how to meet them effectively. I really hope to be back to sport and when I start training would definitely go back again, plus at different physical lifestages as hormones change, or lifestyle changes. I had not previously realised the benefit that one can get and I would recommend it to others.

How do musculoskeletal injuries heal?

Following my blog on how the body heals from invasive surgery (http://www.injuredathlete.co.uk/how-do-you-heal-after-invasive-surgery/) , I thought that it would be useful to do the same for musculoskeletal issues, since these are common injuries for athletes. This is a really huge topic, and I have struggled to get down the most relevant parts into something that I think may be useful for injured athletes and coaches to understand what questions they will ask of the medical team treating them. I have not covered musculoskeletal diseases such as osteoarthritis, carpal tunnel syndrome, tendonitis etc (many of which qualify as a disability under Social Security, if the symptoms reach a certain level of severity), as these are much more complex and long-lasting.

The challenge of most of musculoskeletal injuries is that they generally involve tendons (which connect bones to muscles), ligaments (which connect bone to bone) and/or cartilage (the soft, gel-like tissue that provides cushioning and enables movement in joints). The white colour of these tissue types give a clue to the fact that they do not have their own blood supply. This means that they heal much more slowly than damaged skin or muscles (which have their own blood supply). The surgical view is that they do not regenerate and this is why often surgery is offered – mending torn tendons and ligaments and replacing ruptured ones.

You need to play an active role in healing musculoskeletal injuries

Whilst the fundamental phases of healing are the same as a cut or muscle tear, there are a couple of key differences that you need to act on:

  1. the pain signals through the healing phases are very different and you need to actively manage your way through this – at times managing the pain to protect the healing of the correct Range of Movement for your body. It seems counter-intuitive not to listen to the pain in your body, but this is the reason.
  2. you do need to actively rehabilitate the area through each of the 3 stages, as it is unlikely to heal correctly without your active focus and support: initially using the ‘POLICE’ protocol (see below) and then with range of movement for that joint and then specific strengthening of that area. When you are in a lot of pain, the constant health professional exhortations of ‘keep moving’ may not seem to be very helpful, but this is the reason why.
  3. this is a long-term game, and you can expect to need to focus on this for a period of 12 to 24 months. But for those who stay the course and do the right things, the results do come.

Stage 1 of musculoskeletal healing – Inflammation.

The swelling and redness may be hidden inside the joint, but the symptoms will be such that no time day or night is pain-free and you may be able to detect the heat coming from the joint, as well as the tenderness, pain and loss of range of movement. If rest or a change of position gives relief, then the healing has progressed to the repair stage. The inflammation stage generally lasts 3-5 days, but can last a lot longer and if you re-injure or re-inflame the same area, then you go back into this stage.

The point of this stage for the body is protecting the area with swelling whilst it lays the foundations for the healing – clearing out the damaged cells and starting to spin webs of protective tissue that bind the wound together and stop the flow of liquids through the area.

This is the stage that you really need to apply the ‘POLICE’ protocol. This has replaced the old ‘RICE’ protocol (see the table below). So that in the past, the recommendation was Rest, get an Ice pack on the area, use Compression and Elevate the limb. All of these are designed to reduce the inflammation and allow the body to get through this first stage. Interestingly, anti-inflammatory medications do reduce the inflammation, but interfere with the body’s natural management of inflammation – so as soon as you are out of the immediate pain it is best to stop taking these in order to encourage the cellular-level healing process to begin.

The new ‘POLICE’ protocol reflects the fact that the latest medical studies suggest that some movement is good, even at these early stages. So ‘Protect ‘the joint from the bad motion that has caused the injury (eg twisting), with support, splinting or bracing as needed. Then work to get ‘Optimum Loading’ – moving the joint through the range of movement in every-day activities, but not causing additional pain. This is why we see increasing numbers of people in protective boots and slings, instead of full plaster-casts. The view on ‘Icing’ has also developed – and the guidance is that you should not apply it for longer than 10 minutes and more than 3 times per day (as too much icing can also damage the tissues).

P = Protect
OL = Optimum Loading
R = Rest
I = Ice I = Ice
C = Compression C = Compression
E = Elevation E = Elevation

Stage 2 of musculoskeletal healing – Repair or Proliferation.

During this stage the body develops the new tissue, initially haphazardly and then starting to align these cells correctly. This stage usually starts from a week after the injury and lasts 6-12 weeks or longer. Pain usually comes and goes, according to the position or movement of the body. If pain or fear of pain inhibits movement in this stage, then the pattern with which the scar tissue is laid down can inhibit movement significantly and reduce your body’s ability to function. Failure to stretch and move at this time will lead to weak, but tight muscles that are intermittently painful and vulnerable to re-injury. Therefore you really need to consistently (and gently) put the body through a normal range of movement and the unhelpful cross-fibres will be broken and the useful fibres that support the usual range of movement will be strengthened.  If this repair stage does not lead to correct healing, the danger is that the body will start to develop workarounds and compensating movements, which can lead to aches and injuries elsewhere as the body moves into the third stage of healing with the wrong fundamental structure in the injury area.

Stage 3 of musculoskeletal healing – Remodelling or Maturation.

In this stage the tissues build their flexibility and strength, and this lasts at least 6 months and can be two years or more. Even now, you may get some pain with certain movements (especially when you take the movement to the end-zones of the Range of Movement – which you do need to do), or you may be pain-free. This is why usually from around 4-12 weeks after injury (depending on the injury: follow your surgeon’s or physio’s advice), you should be adding in some strength-based training – starting very gently and slowly building up to 3 sets of 10 repetitions (working to failure), with a day or two of rest between sessions for the body to recover and rebuild (in line with the progressive overload model of development) and obviously backing off if the level of pain increases.

If you do not keep rehabbing the area, there is a very strong probability of significantly reinjuring it because it is so far below strength. This is very challenging, as it is usually just one or two exercises that you need to do over and over again, gently progressing them. And before you have done this, it may well be too premature to go back to a repetitive loading activity like running, or even cycling. Many people do not have the patience to do this progressive strengthening over the period of 12-24 months that it takes, and this is one of the reasons why re-injury is common. Even with the correct rehab, the area often stays 20% weaker than before the injury.  Hence you will need to keep looking at your form to check that there are not compensation behaviours that will cause other injuries, and look at your activities to check that you are giving it the protection that it needs.

Why pain makes this all so much harder

The challenge for many people in chronic pain* is that the correct level of managing the inflammation, mobilising the joint to get the range of movement and strength building across the 3 phases is hard to do. The pain makes them avoid exercise and stretching required for correct healing. At times the level of incorrect healing in stage 2 can need significant manipulation (even under general anaesthetic) to break up the adhesion and re-stimulate inflammation. You then effectively start back at phase 1 of healing, and need to ensure that stretching (for Range of Movement) and exercise (to stimulate the limited blood supply to the area) then begin the process of rehabilitation.

As well as medications, guided corticosteroid injections into the area are common and can bring very significant short-term relief. You need to make the decision on these with your Orthopaedic Consultant. The only anecdote that I would pass on is one where an athlete had a number of injections into the tendon over a 2-year period, and the tendon did rupture. One of the questions was whether the perforations from the multiple injections had played a role.

* The definition of chronic pain varies, but it is long-term pain and most seem to define it as having lasted for over 3 months or over 6 months. I think that the key definition is having been in pain for that length of time, you get to the stage where you adapt your physical, mental and emotional approaches to life (whether consciously or unconsciously) as a consequence of the pain. As well as these external impacts on your life, the internal impacts of your body swimming in the chemicals associated with inflammation and the nerve pain patterns can also have significant impacts on your healing.