Recognising other bloggers who have cast helpful light and perspective on my own challenges

It has been quite some months since I last wrote a blog. The back end of last year was a hard road of trying to get the pain medications to the balance that made the basics of getting through the day possible, and working out how to shrink life to the things that I could get through. Then facing up to the surgeon’s persuasion that a tenth surgical procedure was the best way forward.

Through this time I struggled to find a way to share my experience in a way that I felt could help others.

Plus, I have to say that I found various bloggers and communities who are sharing their experiences and I felt were sharing a lot of the things that I had been searching for over the last two years.

So I wanted to blog to share links to some of them – in the hope that this is helpful for people reading it.

Joletta Belton – My Cuppa Jo (www.mycuppajo.com)

Jo shares her experience of over a decade of pain stopping her ability to work as a firefighter and to run and pursue the sport and life that she loved. She has gone on to do a huge amount of study about posture, musculoskeletal issues and pain, now sharing this with others in her beautiful and inspiring blog posts and also as a patient advocate at international conferences.

Tina – Living Well Pain (www.livingwellpain.net)

Just as Jo has pioneered the path in Canada, Tina has done the same in the UK. Tina’s accident was over two decades ago and she shares her experience of how to live well with persistent neuropathic and musculoskeletal pain with lots of practical tools and advice from her own experience. These come in the form of blog posts on specific topics and most recently as a patient advocate, she has written a guide for patients called ‘Making the most of Physiotherapy’.

Pete Moore – the Pain Toolkit (www.paintoolkit.org)

Pete attended a pain management programme in 1996 and since then has dedicated himself to sharing the best information and knowledge with both patients and clinicians across the globe dealing with persistent pain, especially back pain. He has a great website and has written a number of excellent guides on pain. Most recently he has set up a monthly Pain Toolkit Online Café on Zoom, where anyone is welcome to digitally ‘pop-in’ and chat or listen to others working with similar issues to their own.

Barbara Babcock – Return to Wellness (www.returntowellness.co.uk)

Barbara’s experience of her own neurological illness and also caring for her husband meant that she saw up-close-and-personally the life-changing impact that a serious health issue can have. This led her to use her coaching experience to restore emotional wellbeing and look positively towards the future. Her blogs and self-help tools help across: managing the health issue, reclaiming emotional health, reclaiming relationships, returning to work, reclaiming meaning & purpose in life, reclaiming hobbies & interests and support for carers and supporters.

Jo Moss – A Journey through the Fog (www.ajourneythroughthefog.co.uk)

Jo is bed-bound as a consequence of the health issues that she suffers from. She writes her blog to give other people in the same position a bit of hope. She says “My life isn’t easy, but it is worth living. I may cry a lot, but I also laugh a lot. I may get depressed, but I’m also optimistic. No matter how bad things seem right now, they will get better. You can take back control and give yourself hope for your future”. Her blog is frequent, searingly honest and brutally insightful on topics that others may shy away from.

Sheryl Chan – A Chronic Voice (www.achronicvoice.com)

Sheryl lives and blogs from Singapore, living with multiple lifelong illnesses. Her blog sets out to help other sufferers with a toolbox, but more widely to raise awareness of long-term illnesses from a number of perspectives and encourage empathy amongst all facets of society, and not just healthcare. Her blogs are frequently very practical, covering both the physical and the emotional challenges with equal frequency.

The Princess in the Tower (www.princessinthetower.org)

This site has a number of useful resources for learning about chronic pain and how to manage it and reduce it. The blogs focus a lot on the emotional impact, and ways to manage this.

Then, I also discovered some really useful communities:

HealthUnlocked (www.healthunlocked.com)

This is like a medical version of Facebook and there are different groups that you can sign up to. One of the groups is Pain Concern (a charity that also have a helpline that you can call and lots of other support tools that you can access at www.painconcern.org.uk)

Anyone can post a thread and expect to get genuine responses from others. The tone is universally helpful (in my experience) and can get some good insights. Obviously, this is not professional healthcare advice, so it needs to be seen in that context.

The Injured Athletes Club on Facebook

This community was set up by Carrie Jackson Cheadle and Cindy Kuzma to go with their book ‘Rebound: Train your mind to come back stronger from sports injuries’. They moderate and facilitate the group to get to a mix of being able to vent about challenging times, ask for advice/perspective and celebrate progress, with ‘Winning Wednesdays’, Monday Motivation and Friday Feeling themes running most weeks.

I hope that you find some of these inspiring and helpful, just as I did. If you have others that you think are excellent, then do share!

Is it time to learn from a flea?

Fleas are amazing athletes – with the ability to jump 50 times their body length!

But the inspiration for injured athletes comes from the oft-quoted experiment with fleas in a jar. It is said that if you put fleas in a jar, then they jump out. But if you put a lid on the top to stop them jumping out, you can remove it a short period later and for all that they could jump out they do not. And this lasts for the life of those fleas – they have learned their new limits and do not exceed them.

The path to rehabilitation involves false starts

The really hard part of rehabilitation is that we need to keep trying things and pushing the body to learn and adapt. Sometimes this can hurt a lot, and rekindle the kind of pain that has been so hard to cope with before.

But somehow we have got to find the discipline and strength of mind to keep doing the activities recommended by the Doctors or Physios. Even if previously this led to pain or set-backs. Because this time ‘the lid to the jar’ may have been removed. And we can only find it out by trying.

This is especially hard for athletes

Every single injured athlete that I have met has pushed themselves too hard in the early stages of recovery. We love to believe that we can always be in the top 5 or 10% of people, and always beat the timings and goals through sheer willpower and determination. Sadly that cannot always be true for our bodies.

So as time goes on, the people around us get used to warning us and holding us back. And we too often start to look on the more pessimistic side, in order to avoid slipping backwards and to protect ourselves. But when is the time to move on from this important protection and guarding behaviour? How can we know?

Keeping a diary of activity and pain is very useful

Just like a good training log, a diary of activity and pain levels really helps to show the trends and ensure a gentle progression, together with the right nutrition, hydration, sleep and rest. It can also help to look at the potential reasons for times when the pain is bad, or you slip backward.

So we need to learn from the fleas as we progress down the rehabilitation path and need to spot the moments where we are being too conservative and could be holding ourselves back. Our loved ones and closest friends can also be really useful advisers, and we should ask them to look out for signs of when we need to step up and leave our injured past behind in order to get to the recovering future that we want so much.

Gaining the lift to recover after a difficult injury can be very hard, and takes work both mentally as well as physically.